Tag Archives: Herberger Theater Center

Art camps for at-risk youth

Tatiana (L) and Michael at Free Arts of Arizona’s 2011 Multicultural Arts Camp

Chicano arts. Native American arts. African drumming. Latin dance. And spoken word. They’re all part of this year’s Multicultural Arts Camp presented by Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona, which “uses artistic expression and creativity to heal abused and homeless children across the Valley.”

This year’s camp will serve 125 abused, homeless or at-risk youth, who’ll rotate through five workshops focused on multicultural and multidisciplinary arts as well as team-building activities. All are led by professional teaching artists — including Frank Thompson, Melanie Sainz, Christa Iceforest, Myrlin Hepworth and Misha Pemberton.

“Artists and workshops are purposefully chosen so that campers can experience arts from various cultures as well as various mediums,” according to Barbara DuVal Fenster, executive director for Free Arts. Think dance, music, visual arts and creative writing.

Two camp sessions are taking place at Desiderata Alternative High School in Phoenix. Both include breakfast, lunch and snacks throughout the day. This week’s camp, for 14-17 year olds, concludes with a June 8 showcase. Next week’s camp, for 9-13 year olds, wraps up with a showcase on June 15.

Pam Chu with campers during Free Arts’ 2011 Multicultural Arts Camp

“In addition to our artists and volunteers, we invite a few teens from the first session to serve as volunteers for the second session,” says Fenster. “For them,” she says, “it is a chance to move from camper to leader.” For the folks at Free Arts, it’s “an opportunity to watch young people grow, mature and build their self-esteem.”

Since 2001, the Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix has worked with Free Arts to “heal young lives through the performing arts” by giving teens from group homes, shelters and treatment facilities throughout Maricopa County “the opportunity to create and experience the arts” through a two-week theater camp at the Herberger Theater Center.

During this year’s Summer Theater Camp, guest artists and volunteers will help children explore improvisation, character development, mask making, costumes, props and the technical side of theater production — then guide them in creating a production they’ll share during a final performance at the Herberger (Fri, June 29 at 7pm) that’s free and open to the public.

— Lynn

Note: A restaurant called Hula’s Modern Tiki, located at 4700 N. Central Ave. in Phoenix, is donating 10 percent of proceeds every Monday in July to Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona.

Coming up: Feeling like a million bucks

Update: I’m now blogging as “Stage Mom Musings” at www.stagemommusings.com. Please find and follow me there to continue receiving posts about arts and culture in Arizona and beyond. Thanks for your patience as the tech fairies work to move all 1,250+ posts to the new site. For the latest news follow me on Twitter @stagemommusings. 6/13/12

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Touched with fire?

Victor Hugo, one of many poets believed to have had a mood disorder

There’s nothing romantic about suicide. Or mental illness. Romeo and Juliet make for compelling characters, but no one should envy their fate. Those who champion the cause of suicide prevention are gathering at the Hayden Lawn at ASU in Tempe this Saturday for one of more than 40 “Out of Darkness” walks taking place around the country. They’re being presented by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which estimates that close to one million Americans attempt suicide each year. More than 36,000 Americans die by suicide each year. Think every 15 minutes.

Irving Berlin, one of many composers thought to have had a mood disorder

Depression and suicide get too little attention from a nation that seems at times incapable of focusing on more than a single challenge. I’m all for research and supports for people living with autism, cancer and diabetes. But 1 in 10 American adults report experiencing depression, which also strikes our youth — and it’s a disease that can kill.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention notes that 90% of all suicides are related to some form of mental illness, most often depression — which is actually quite treatable. Events like this Saturday’s “Out of Darkness” walk at ASU, which already has more than 250 registered walkers, remind us all to take suicide seriously — and to support prevention strategies that save lives. “Out of Darkness” campus walks help the foundation with research, education, public awareness, screenings, programs to support survivors of suicide and more, according to Dawn Hunter, chair of the group’s Arizona chapter.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of many writers considered to have had a mood disorder

For folks with a special interest in the intersection of art and mental illness, Kay Redfield Jamison’s “Touched With Fire” is an enlightening read. I first read the work when it was released in 1993. James and I were already several years into our journey of parenting a child with mental illness.

I’m revisiting the book this week, looking for insights into the relationship of creativity to mental illness — because “Touched With Fire,” which is subtitled “Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament,” is a comprehensive scholarly treatment of a topic that continues to hold great relevance.

Emily Dickinson, one of many poets thought to have had a mood disorder

The book includes an appendix listing writers, artists and composers with “probable cyclothemia, major depression, or manic-depressive illness” — which includes names familiar to those with even a cursory background in arts and  culture.

It seems the longest list belongs to poets. Think William Blake, Robert Burns, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, Victor Hugo, John Keats, Edgar Allan Poe, Anne Sexton, Walt Whitman and more. Also writers — Hans Christian Andersen, Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henrik Ibsen, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tennessee Williams, Virginia Woolf and others.

Victor van Gogh, one of many artists thought to have had a mood disorder

Composers on Jamison’s “probable” list include George Frideric Handel, Gustav Mahler, Sergey Rachmaninoff, Robert Schumann and Peter Tchaikovsky — and “nonclassical composers and musicians” noted include Irving Berlin, Noel Coward, Stephen Foster and Cole Porter.

Jamison writes that “Many if not most of these writers, artists and composers had other health problems as well, such as medical illnesses, alcoholism or drug addiction.” Artists on the list include Thomas Eakins, Paul Gaugin, Vincent van Gogh, Michelangelo, Edvard Munch, Georgia O’Keefe, Jackson Pollock and many more.

Virginia Woolf, one of many writers thought to have had a mood disorder

“They are listed,” explains Jamison, “…because their mood symptoms predated their other conditions, because the nature and course of their mood and behavior symptoms were consistent with a diagnosis of an independently existing affective illness, and/or because their family histories…coupled with their own symptoms–were sufficiently strong enough to warrant their inclusion.”

For those of you wondering what qualifies Jamison to draw such conclusions, I offer two important facts. Jamison herself is living with manic-depressive illness, also called “bipolar disorder.” And she’s a professor of psychiatry with The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her own struggles with mental illness are recounted in other works she’s published — including “An Unquiet Mind” and “Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide.”

Click here to learn more about Saturday’s “Out of Darkness” walk — and here to get additional information about suicide and suicide prevention. “Suicide is the third leading cause of death among teens and young adults and the second leading cause of death for college students,” according to Hunter. Every parent, educator and artist should be literate on the topic of suicide prevention because denial is a dangerous thing.

— Lynn

Note: NAMI Walks, another event raising mental health awareness, is scheduled for Oct. 20, 2012 (starting at the Arizona State Capitol). Click here to find additional resources through the Arizona Coalition for Suicide Prevention. Click here for details about an exhibit featuring Vincent van Gogh at the Arizona Science Center in Phoenix and here for details about an Arizona Theatre Company production of “F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby” at the Herberger Theater Center.

Coming up: More books from Lynn’s library

Once upon a “Gatsby”

Zachary Ford (Nick Carraway) in the Arizona Theatre Company production of "The Great Gatsby" (Photo: Tim Fuller/ATC)

Our oldest daughter Jennifer, now a cultural anthropology student at ASU in Tempe, was incredibly keen on anything and everything by F. Scott Fitzgerald during one particular year of high school — so we spent lots of time chasing some of his harder to find works.

I don’t remember feeling nearly as enamoured with the American writer who lived from 1896 to 1940, best known to many for coining the term “Jazz Age” and writing about its many manifestations.

It’s harder to love something when told we ought to do so, or when everyone else seems smitten with it — which might explain why I felt so completely unmoved while watching “The Great Gatsby” unfold at Herberger Theater Center Saturday night.

The company of the Arizona Theatre Company production of "The Great Gatsby" (Photo: Tim Fuller/ATC)

The performance was pristine and passionate, and embraced with genuine enthusiasm by an audience that laughed and let out knowing sighs throughout. But I just couldn’t go there. The characters are odd in ways I find completely unrelatable, unlike those in “The Glass Menagerie” performed during Arizona Theatre Company’s 2009-10 season.

David Andrew Macdonald (Jay Gatsby) and Monette Magrath (Daisy Buchanan) in the Arizona Theatre Company production of "The Great Gatsby" (Photo: Tim Fuller/ATC)

If the lingering effect of anesthesia somehow blunted my ability to feel this story, it certainly didn’t curtail my appreciation for the beauty of this production, which features some of the best lighting, sets and costumes I’ve seen here in the Valley. It’s well-acted and directed, making for a sort of master class in bringing great literature to the stage.

David Andrew Macdonald (Jay Gatsby) in the Arizona Theatre Company production of "The Great Gatsby" (Photo: Tim Fuller/ATC)

“F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby” is adapted by Simon Levy, and directed by Stephen Wrentmore. Scenic design is by Yoon Bae, costume design is by David Kay Mickelsen and lighting design is by Dawn Chiang. It stars Zachary Ford as Nick Carraway, David Andrew Macdonald as Jay Gatsby and Monette Magrath as Daisy Buchanan.

Few companies excel like Arizona Theatre Company in “theater as teacher” mode. Their play guides are interesting reads — especially in the case of “The Great Gatsby.” Explore it online if you’re eager to learn more about the Roaring ’20s, the Prohibition era and the Jazz Age. Also what the ’20s meant for women’s rights and developments in New York City. There’s even a nifty timeline filled with truly fascinating fare.

I may never share my daughter’s insights into the world or writings of F. Scott Fitzgerald, but Arizona Theater Company is certainly inching me closer.

— Lynn

Note: Arizona Theatre Company performs “The Great Gatsby” at the Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix through April 8. Click here for details.

Coming up: Taking risks

From Wallace to Willy

Pat McMahon and the cast of "The Wallace & Ladmo Show" (Photo: Centennial Theatre Foundation)

Like many parents born and raised here in Arizona, my husband James grew up watching “The Wallace & Ladmo Show” — the longest running same-cast children’s television show in history. Think 1954 to 1989. Thanks to a collaboration between Centennial Theatre Foundation, Actors Theatre and Desert Foothills Theatre, generations old and new can revisit the show via a production written and directed by Ben Tyler.

It’s being presented this weekend by Desert Foothills Theatre (and during June at the Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix). Performances take place March 23-25 at Cactus Shadows Fine Arts Center in Scottdale. Folks eager to explore this and other historic fare can also visit the House of Broadcasting in Scottsdale.

Musical Theatre of Anthem performs "Willy Wonka" March 29-April 1 (Photo: Olga Smirnoff)

Another North Valley theater, Musical Theatre of Anthem, has exciting news to share. Their production of “Willy Wonka,” being performed at the Boulder Creek High School mini-auditorium in Anthem, opens Thurs, March 29 and runs through Sun, April 1. They’re also anticipating the opening of their new theater at 42323 N. Vision Wy. come July, just in time for summer theater classes.

Musical Theatre of Anthem recently revealed its 2012/13 lineup, which includes “Our Town” (Sept), “Thoroughly Modern Millie” (Sept/Oct), “The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley Jr.” (Oct), “A Year With Frog and Toad KIDS” (Oct), “Thumbelina (A Swallow’s Tale)” (Nov), “Something Beautiful” (Nov/Dec), “Winnie the Pooh KIDS” (Feb), “Little Shop of Horrors” (March), “Dear Edwina JR.” (March) and another show that’ll be announced once rights are secured. Their 2012/13 season also includes a holiday show (TBD in Dec) and fundraiser (Feb).

This future home of Musical Theatre of Anthem should be ready in July

The Arts Council of the North Valley presents their “7th Annual Regional Teen Art Competition” at The Caepe School and Fellowship Church in Anthem Sat, April 28 and Sun, April 29. The works of more than 60 students from area high schools will be exhibited. Think paintings, sculpture, photography and drawings. A panel of professional artists and educators will select winners, and folks who attend can cast their vote for “Viewers’ Choice.”

The council also presents “Picnic Under the Stars” next month. The Sat, April 28 benefit includes “a live auction, raffle items, culinary delights, and a cash bar.” Click here to learn more about the council’s many programs, including educational outreach — or to sign up for Arts Council of the North Valley alerts featuring timely news on music, dance, theater and visual arts offerings.

— Lynn

Note: Both Musical Theatre of Anthem and Desert Foothills Theatre offer summer theater camps, so check their websites for details (and find additional camp options here).

Coming up: I’m more than these stripes

Gaga for dance

Batsheva Dance of Israel performs March 22 in Scottsdale

Israel’s Batsheva Dance Company, founded in 1964 by Martha Graham and Baroness Batsheva De Rothschild, uses a little something called “Gaga” — the movement vocabulary of choreographer Ohad Naharin — to explore and perform “new movement possibilities.” Folks who go “gaga for dance” can enjoy their work Thurs, March 22 at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts.

Come April, the center will present two companies from Australia — “Chunky Move: Connected” Fri, April 6 and Sat, April 7 and “Marrugeku: Buru” Sat, April 14. The latter features “stories of the indigenous people of Western Australia told through hip-hop music and stilt dancing.” They’ll present “Dance Brazil,” featuring “dazzling Afro-Brazilian music and dance” Thurs, April 26 and Fri, April 27 and Movement Source Dance Company brings their “Inspiration” to the venue Thurs, May 10 and Fri, May 11.

SambAZ performs March 24 at the MIM in Phoenix

The Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix presents “Experience Brazil” Sat, March 24 — which includes SambAZ dancers performing works inspired by “Brazilian and Carnaval culture” with Grupo Liberdade from 11am to 12:30pm. The event also features live music, drum workshops and more.

If you’re truly “gaga for dance,” a couple of dance performances will never do. Hence, I’m happy to share a diverse assortment of additional offerings headed our way in coming weeks and months, including several taking place this month. Let other folks go “gaga” for shoes or chocolate or basketball. You know that dance is where it’s at.

Katey Koderik performs "I Believe" for American Voices 2011 (Photo: Tim Fuller)

Center Dance Ensemble performs “Dance AZ/100,” which honors the Arizona Centennial with the premiere of “Western Suite” to music by Aaron Copeland and “Concierto Madigral” music by Joaquin Rodrigo March 22-25 at the Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix. Come April they’ll perform “American Voices” featuring new choreography to the words of America’s great poets.

Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, which blends “African American cultural expression and the American modern dance tradition,” performs Sat, March 24 and Sun, March 25 at Mesa Arts Center. “Dancing with the Queen Creek Stars” hits the Queen Creek Performing Arts Center Sat, March 24 — featuring six “respected community leaders” partnered with the Utah Ballroom Dance Company for waltz, samba and such. MarioCo. Dance brings jazz dance to the Herberger Theater Center Thurs, March 15, with a performance dubbed “Propulsion.”

Alvin Ailey Dance Theater performs March 24 & 25 in Mesa

Ballet Arizona presents “Director’s Choice” March 29-April 1, a new Ib Andersen work titled “Topia” May 2-26 (in  collaboration with the Desert Botanical Garden) and “All Balanchine” May 31-June 3.

State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara performs “Jungle Book” — an original production by Rodney Gustafson set in the fabled jungles of Rudyard Kipling’s Africa — Fri, March 30 at the Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts in Wickenburg. A lovely option for those of you who go “gaga” for both dance and exploring other parts of our fair state.

Scorpius Dance Theatre performs May 3-5 in Phoenix

Scorpius Dance Theatre presents “The Kick-A Dance Showcase” featuring the work of Arizona choreographers plus those from other fab places May 3-5 at the Phoenix Theatre Little Theatre. Let your little ones think the “A” stands for “arabesque.”

Finally, I leave you with a trio of dance events coming to Tempe Center for the Arts. Flamenco and belly dance artists Yumi LaRosa and Ava Fleming present “cultural music and dance” Sat, March 31 at TCA. CONDER/dance presents “inextricably linked” — “a performance inspired by flight and costumed entirely in vintage clothing” — Sat, April 14. The CONDER/dance performance also includes dance films from Belgium and NYC.

A Ludwig Dance Theatre performs April 19-22 in Tempe

A Ludwig Dance Theatre presents “Project 2012: Looking Back; Moving Forward” April 19-22 at Tempe Center for the Arts — which continues the company’s collaboration with choreographers Babs Case, Mary Fitzgerald, Kelly Roth, Karen Schupp. Look for a reprise of past works, an examination of issues facing contemporary society, audience involvement via text messaging and a little something that’ll have Valley theater buffs going “gaga” — the performance of a Daniel Nagrin improvisational piece titled “Someone” by actor, fight choreographer and ASU professor David Barker. That, my friends, will be a “gaga” moment in all its glory.

— Lynn

Note: I’m working on a roundup of spring recitals and performances being presented by youth dance companies and dance schools in the Valley. If your group is presenting a spring recital or performance, please send details (and photos if you like) to rakstagemom@gmail.com.

Coming up: Dance meets dirt?, From Brooklyn to Japan

Between Oscars and Tonys

Get your fancy on for this year's Governor's Arts Awards, taking place March 27 at the lovely Herberger Theater Center in Phoenix

Those of you needing a bit of an awards show fix between the Oscars and the Tony Awards have a friend is Governor Jan Brewer, who’ll be hosting an annual awards event celebrating some of the best in Arizona arts and culture.

More than 80 nominations were submitted from 18 Arizona communities in six categories for the 31st annual Governor’s Arts Awards — being presented Tues, March 27 at the Herberger Theater Center.

The celebration begins at 5pm with a reception — complete with silent auction.  Honorees will be recognized at the “Oscar-style ceremony” at 7pm. An 8pm dessert reception follows. Yum.

The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 144 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards.

Nominees by category are noted below, along with nominee hometowns.

Arts in Education ~ Organization

Arizona School for Arts, Phoenix; Arizona Theatre Company, Phoenix; EPIK Dance Company, Phoenix; Grand Canyon Guitar Society, Flagstaff; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; Morristown Elementary School, Morristown; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; Prescott College Visual Arts Program, Prescott; Scottsdale Artists School, Scottsdale; Sedona Arts Center, Sedona; Sonoran Glass Art Academy, Tucson; Southwest Shakespeare Company, Mesa; Superstition Review, Mesa; The Rise Project, Phoenix; UApresents, Tucson; Walnut Canyon Press, Scottsdale; West Valley Arts Council, Surprise.

Business

Adelante Healthcare, Phoenix; DMB Associates, Inc., Buckeye; General Growth Properties, Tucson; J.P. Morgan Chase, Phoenix; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community

Anthology, Mesa; Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering, Prescott; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff City- Coconino County, Flagstaff; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; New Carpa Theater Company, Phoenix; Public Art Program, Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture, Phoenix; United Cerebral Palsy of Arizona; University of Arizona Poetry Center, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona LTD, Phoenix.

Individual

Robert Breunig, Ph.D., Flagstaff; Nancy DeStefani, Mesa; Jody Drake, Prescott; Rebecca Dyer, Mesa; Linda Essig, Phoenix; Carmen de Novais Guerrero, Mesa; Kathy Hotchner, Scottsdale; Steve Jennings, Scottsdale; Colleen Jennings-Roggensack, Tempe; Dr. Larry Lang, Tucson; Amanda Kate Marques, Tucson; Fletcher McCusker, Tucson; Bill & Merry Nebeker, Prescott; Judy Phillips, Yuma; Julie Sasse, Tucson; Charles Spillar, Tucson; Aimee Stewart, Chandler; Nancy Wolter, Gilbert.

Artist

Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Warren Cohen, Cave Creek; Bob Cooper, Phoenix; James L. Covarrubias, Tempe; Persephone Dimson, Scottsdale; Lawrence Enyart, FAIA, Phoenix; Eugene Grisby, Phoenix; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; William LeGoullon, Scottsdale; Gertrude Lopez, Phoenix; Patsy Lowery,
Phoenix; John Massaro, Phoenix; Ed Mell, Phoenix; Antonio Pasos, Phoenix; Brad Richter, Tucson; Jared Sakren, Scottsdale; Synde Heather Schinkel, Scottsdale; Louise Stidham Photography, Gilbert; Matthew Wiener, Phoenix.

Arts in Education ~ Individual

Linda Ahearn, Toscana Gallery, Tucson; Annica Benning, Walnut Canyon Press, Scottsdale; Mariana Carreras, Pima Community College, Tucson;.William Eaton, Roberto-Venn School of Luthery, Phoenix; Evelyn Holbrook, Desert Foothills Community Theatre, Cave Creek; Janet Klein, Kyrene District Art Educator, Tempe; Beth Lesard, Ph.D., Tempe; Barbara Nueske-Perez, Tesseract School, Phoenix; Claude Pensis, Grand Canyon University, Phoenix; Lesa Schuur, L. Thomas Heck Middle School, Avondale; Debra K. Stevens, Childsplay, Tempe.

The seventh annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona. The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for non-members. Sponsorships are available. Recipients, by the way, are selected by an independent panel. But, duh. They’re all winners — as are those of us who reap the rewards of their hard work and dedication.

For information or reservations, visit www.governorsartsawards.org.

— Lynn

Coming up: Awards for young artists

Charlotte’s Web

Young Arts Arizona worked with children and teens from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale to create custom artwork you can enjoy when you see the show

Valley Youth Theatre opened its production of the play “Charlotte’s Web,” directed by Lauren Antioco, this weekend. It’s a Joseph Robinette adaptation of E.B. White’s classic book about friendship, loyalty and self-sacrifice. And it’s beautifully done.

Charlotte's Web cast members get ready to meet and greet fans

The set design by Dori Brown in striking, as is lighting design by D.J. Selmeyer. Costume design by Karol Cooper perfectly captures the small farmtown setting from head to toe. Sound design by Clearwing Production is also exceptional. Taken together, they make “Charlotte’s Web” one of the best designed pieces of youth theater I’ve seen to date.

Sam Primack (Wilbur) poses with two young fans after the show

The production was also exceptionally well cast. Lead roles went to Hannah Blaile of Arcadia High School (Charlotte), Sophia Drapeau of Veritas Preparatory Academy (Fern) and Sam Primack of Cherokee Elementary (Wilbur). Primack has plenty of acting experience, and it shows. Together, the show’s 29 cast members create a cohesive, capable ensemble.

Charlotte's Web cast members pose for photos after the show

I especially enjoyed performances by the actors noted above — plus Jamie Grossman of Ironwood High School (Edith Zuckerman), Audrey Nelson of Archway Classical Academy (Little Lamb) and Aaron Zweiback (Templeton) of Arizona School for the Arts. Also Erik Wilson (Avery), a medieval history buff who didn’t note a school in his program bio.

These young ladies came out to see Sophia perform the role of Fern

A mother I talked to during intermission shared that the production had just the right balance for her two young daughters — holding their interest without being too loud or busy. To producing artistic director Bobb Cooper’s credit, “Charlotte’s Web” is just simple, elegant storytelling that shows real respect for young viewers.

Future teacher Audrey Nelson (Little Lamb) signs autographs after the show

“Charlotte’s Web” is being performed at Valley Youth Theatre through Feb. 19. Next up is Julianne Moore’s “Freckleface Strawberry” and “The Wiz” (which’ll be performed at the Herberger Theater Center). When you go, stay after the show to enjoy meeting cast members, who love signing autographs and talking with young fans.

You'll enjoy both visual and performing arts at Valley Youth Theatre in Phoenix

Also take time to enjoy “Charlotte’s Web” inspired artwork created by children and teens from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale through Young Arts Arizona. Valley Youth Theatre is one of several venues that displays Young Arts Arizona works — and pictures currently exhibited at VYT feature pigs, geese, spiders and webs sporting words ala Charlotte herself.

— Lynn

Note: Click here to learn more about VYT shows, spring break camps, performing arts classes and more.

Coming up: Don’t mock the presidents!