Shalom Pardner

That’s the word from the Jewish Museum in Tucson, which presents “Celebrating Arizona: The Centennial Exhibit” Feb. 10-24, 2012.

Seems they’ve deemed “Shalom Pardner” and its cactus-donning cowboy hat their official 2012 logo. I’m told that T-shirts, mugs and totes that feature the kicky caption will be available in the museum’s gift shop next year.

But first, you can head to Tucson for a bit of Jewish-style Christmas fun on Sun, Dec. 25 when they present a progam titled “Did the Pioneer Jews Eat Chinese Food on Christmas Day?” Those who attend can enjoy a kosher vegetarian meal catered by a local Chinese restaurant. (Click here for reservations.)

Folks who revel in the fine art of storytelling can enjoy the museum’s “Jewish Storytelling Festival” Feb. 26-March 27, 2012. It kicks off with a presentation by Nancy K. Miller, author of “What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past.”

The book recount’s Miller’s quest to find her family’s missing past starting with only a few objects passed down from her father — locks of hair, a postcard from Argentina, a cemetary receipt and letters written in Yiddish. The journey takes her from Eastern Europe to the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

All history is personal history — only preserved when we honor, know and share it.

— Lynn

Note: The Jewish History Museum in Tucson is open to the public Tues/Wed and Sat/Sun from 1-5pm and Fri noon-3pm . Always call ahead to confirm details. Click here for more information, and here to learn about the Tucson Children’s Museum.

Coming up: Museum meets schoolhouse, Housewife meets robot

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