Ode to Battery Park City

A view across the Hudson River from Battery Park City in New York

I hadn’t realized, while strolling one June afternoon through Battery Park City in New York, that I’d soon be watching Anderson Cooper and other reporters bracing for the impact of a hurricane or tropical storm on this and other low-lying areas of Lower Manhattan.

The Battery Park City I remember has NYC’s first “green” library decorated in bright orange colors, a waterfront playground that sports a child-size concrete hippo fountain, a pair of towering sculptures, a promenade filled with festival style street vendors offering giant pickles and small paintings, and gardens filled with pink and purple hydrangeas winding through streets lined with utilitarian yet elegant buildings.

Battery Park City borders the Hudson River, so ferries and sailboats are plentiful. Folks who read and write poetry linger at Poets House. Shoppers gather fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs at the Green Market. People who work at the World Financial Center gather for lunch at bistro tables along a pier where barbeque goes bigtime on giant drum-shaped grills.

Like many portions of the East Coast, Battery Park City may look very different tomorrow than it looked just yesterday. For those of you who are fellow lovers of NYC, I offer a few photos that capture a bit of the spirit of Battery Park City — and look forward to seeing images from others that capture the spirit of the many people who’ll be working together in the aftermath of Irene to restore the homes and communities they cherish.

This playground along the Hudson River must be eerily silent this weekend…

Reporters have replaced families along the riverfront in Battery Park City…

Wind and flooding may damage public artworks in low-lying parts of Manhattan…
 

Words from Poets House hang in the Battery Park City ferry terminal…

Winds from Irene may be strong enough to damage this ferry terminal…

The Battery Park City ferry terminal floats atop water in the Hudson River…

I’ll be doing my happy dance once ferries can travel between NY and NJ harbors…

Let’s hope boats docked near the New York Merchantile Exchange got moved…

It’s too soon to know when folks in low-lying areas can return to normal life…

More to ponder from another Poets House banner in Battery Park City…

— Lynn

Note: Visit the American Red Cross at www.redcross.org to learn how you can help those affected by Hurricane Irene

Coming up: Photo tour of the Children’s Museum of Phoenix

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