Tag Archives: Tempe

Oh, Rats!

Stephan Pastis chats with young fans at Changing Hands Bookstore in Tempe

I’m guessing that something along these lines ran through Stephan Pastis’ mind once he realized that being an associate at a large San Francisco law firm just wasn’t his vibe. Pastis recounted his journey from attorney to comic strip creator at last night’s author signing event at Changing Hands Bookstore in Tempe.

Seems he used to leave the law firm for lunch and hit the local bookstore — sitting on the floor in a suit and tie as he read through every “Dilbert” comic strip he could get his hands on. By then, he’d drawn oodles of strips, sent them to the folks who place such things in newspapers and started a lovely collection of rejection letters.

When he realized in 1997 that what he’d been doing wasn’t working, he decided to study the work of an artist whose work was all the rage. Hence the daily “Dilbert” pilgrimages. Today Pastis has his own devotees, including the 170 or so who flocked to Changing Hands Bookstore Thursday night.

Pastis poses with a 3-year-old fan at Changing Hands

Pastis’ own father was there, as were fans ages three and up. Pastis treated his audience to a lengthy bit of storytelling ala slides showing examples of his works — which feature the adventures of a rat, pig, pack of crocodiles and other creatures with a gift for sarcasm many call “dark” and “edgy.”

In one strip, a character finds that part of his Christmas nativity scene has been stolen. The final panel shows Pig walking door to door asking “Have YOU found Jesus?” Pastis’ works are sometimes irreverent, but always lighthearted rather than acerbic. Still, he has a sizeable collection of letters from folks who’ve failed to appreciate particular pieces of his humor through the years.

Pastis shared tales of meeting other comic strip legends — Charles Schultz (or “Sparky”), Bill Keane, Cathy Guiseweit and others. Folks who attend future stops on Pastis’ current tour will enjoy hearing stories of “naked Twister” and other misadventures. Not to worry — no real nudity is involved.

“Pearls Before Swine” fans are accustomed to the strip’s violent themes, which others sometimes fail to appreciate. Pastis seems a bit puzzled by their disdain, noting that he grew up watching “Bugs Bunny” and other cartoons with plenty of death and destruction.

Other early influences cited by Pastis include “Tom and Jerry” on television and “The Far Side” in print. “I could watch Laurel and Hardy endlessly,” says Pastis — who also shares that “the most exciting moment of my life” came each week during the last five minutes of “Saturday Night Live,” when “Mr. Bill” came on.

The odds of having a successful syndicated comic strip are infinitesimal, observes Pastis. A syndicated strip, by the way, is one placed in multiple outlets by a single agent representing the artist. “Every syndicate gets 6,000 submissions a year,” according to Pastis, who adds that “they accept just one.”

“In the first year,” notes Pastis, “five out of six new comic strips fail.” Hence, he cites the odds of successful syndication at one in 36,000. You have a better chance, reflects Pastis, of being hit by lightning or dying after falling off a ladder. I suppose the most cynical comic strip creators will run with this lovely factoid — hauling their paper and pens up ladders during rainstorms to do their best work.

Both Jennifer (above) and her sister Lizabeth are long-time fans of "Pearls Before Swine"

Pastis stayed after his presentation at Changing Hands Bookstore to sign autographs inside copies of his latest book, titled “Larry in Wonderland.” Also other books, t-shirts and “Pearls Before Swine” plush toys. He tends to favor the bottoms of the plush Rats and Pigs, noting that they’re smoother than the other body parts and easier to sign.

Pastis was patient, gracious and genuinely engaged with every person he spoke with — including several folks who offered storyline ideas and the many children and teens eager to discuss their own love of drawing or writing. Every autograph Pastis signed Thursday night included a drawing of Rat.

My own daughter, Jennifer, jokingly asked Pastis to inscribe a book with “Dear eBay customer” and got her wish. Sensing my dismay Pastis asked, “Is this going to turn into a fight in the car?” I assured Pastis we’d be on to a different fight by then. He laughed with twinkling eyes and an infectious smile.

Pastis and his wife have two children of their own, whose names are hidden in the cover art of most Pastis books. You can try to find them if ever you’re lucky enough to be standing in line waiting to meet this remarkable storyteller, artist and humorist.

– Lynn

NoteClick here to read Pastis’ “Pearls Before Swine” blog, and here to learn about future events taking place at Changing Hands Bookstore (plus the bookstore’s participation in Saturday’s Arizona Humanities Festival in downtown Phoenix). Click here to read an earlier post about Pastis titled “When Pigs Fly.”

Coming up: Banter with the Blue Man Group, “Midsummer” meets “Arabian Nights,” Celebrating the humanities — festival style

A trio of tributes

Detail of artwork by theater students at Arizona School for the Arts

Detail of artwork by theater students at Arizona School for the Arts

In Tempe Beach Park, a flag is flying for each person who perished in the attacks of September 11, 2001. So too in Battery Park, New York — where stripes on the flags have been replaced by the names of those killed, and people gathered Saturday morning to form a human chain of solidarity and remembrance.

Candlelight vigils in Scottsdale and countless cities throughout the world are honoring those lost, as well as those who remain. A beam from the World Trade Center is being installed at a Gilbert memorial, and a sculpture crafted of three sections of WTC buildings has been unveiled in London’s Battersea Park — a tribute to the 67 Britons lost that day.

Detail of Tiles for America exhibit in New York City

But it’s a trio of tributes, our country’s permanent memorials to 9/11, that most will visit in coming days, decades and beyond. One in Pennsylvania. One in New York. One in Washington, D.C.

I was particularly moved while watching a live C-SPAN broadcast of the dedication ceremony Saturday morning for the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania, where the heroism of everyday Americans was honored by dignitaries, artists, family members and others.

Poet Robert Pinsky read two works — “Souvenir of the Ancient World” by Carlos Drummond de Andrade and “Incantation” by Czeslaw Milosz. The second was interrupted at our house by a call from the National Republican Party. The timing made my stomach turn.

Art from one of two Tiles for America exhibits in NYC

I heard an interview with George Packer, who has a piece titled “Coming Apart” in the Sept 12, 2011 issue of New Yorker magazine, on NPR today. He noted that two things he’d hoped might change about America in the aftermath of 9/11 are much the same. Our partisan politics and the growing gap between America’s rich and poor.

I hope our national 9/11 memorials will help to change that. Reminding us of what we have in common. Reminding us that every person matters. Reminding us to volunteer in service to others. Reminding us to be grateful.

During the “New York Says Thank You” documentary broadcast on local FOX affiliates Saturday evening, several people involved with the “I Will” campaign shared ways they’ll be honoring those directly affected by 9/11.

More street art from Tiles for America

Actor Mariska Hargitay plans to volunteer at her local domestic violence shelter. A teen girl says she’ll “clean up my room.” A middle-aged man plans to plant a tree at the Flight 93 National Memorial. And a woman about my age says simply, “I will forgive.”

The Friends of Flight 93 and the National Parks Service (which operates the Flight 93 National Memorial) are partnering with the Fred M. Rogers Center at Saint Vincent’s College in Pennsylvania for an October event titled “9/11 Forum: Impact on Young Children.” And folks far and wide have started discussions about incorporating 9/11 into school curriculum materials.

My “I Will” is following the developments of the trio of tributes best known to Americans and sharing them with our readers, not just on 9/11 but throughout the year. But also the everyday stories of children, families, teachers, artists and others working to make September 12 and every day that follows a day of healing, humility and hope.

– Lynn

Note: Learn more about the Flight 93 National Memorial at www.npca.org and www.honorflight93.org, the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial at www.pentagonmemorial.org and the 9/11 Memorial in NYC at www.911memorial.org. All three appreciate gifts of time and money as they move forward honoring those affected by 9/11. Learn about “I Will” at www.911day.org.  Watch eight artists “talk about how that day and its aftermath have informed their work and lives” at www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/09/02/us/sept-11-reckoning/artists.html?ref=arts.

Coming up: A photo tour of memorials at Phoenix’s Wesley Bolin Plaza

9/11 meets Arizona arts and culture

This work by Sam Irving is one of several you can enjoy at exhibits at two Gilbert libraries this week (Photo courtesy of Gilbert Fire Department)

The town of Gilbert is preparing for Sunday’s dedication of a 9/11 memorial to feature an 8-foot long beam from the World Trade Center.

Recently they invited folks to submit photographs, paintings and drawings with a “Memory of Hope” theme. Selected works are on exhibit through 9/11 at the Southeast Regional and Perry High libraries. www.gilbertaz.gov/911memorial.

One of several works currently on exhibit at the Tucson Jewish Community Center

Contemporary Artists of Southern Arizona has created a mixed media 9/11 memorial called “3,000 Souls” that’s being exhibited at the Tucson Jewish Community Center through Sept 26. ww.tucsonjcc.org/arts.

The ceramics program and fine arts department at Desert Vista High School in Phoenix (part of the Tempe Unified High School District) presents a 9/11 memorial Thurs, Sept 9 from 6-9pm (room 149).

The event features “students from dance and theatre,
choir, speech and band, a special slide and musical tribute, the
signing of victims’ names into a tribute vessel to be delivered to New
York in December, and fundraising for the WTC Health Hospital.” The event is free and open to the public. www.desertvista.schoolfusion.us.

Several 9/11-related items, including a huge “National Unity Flag” designed and created in Arizona, will be exhibited Sept 9-16 in the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts atrium.

A “9/11 Memorial Wall” with 2,996 full-color memorial cards featuring biographical information and photographs of 9/11 victims will be exhibited as well.

Scottsdale begins a “9/11 Day of Remembrance” program in the atrium at 1pm on Sun, Sept 11 with a reading of victims’ names.

Keynote speaker Ray Malone, a former New York police office and firefighter, follows in the Virginia G. Piper Theater at 6pm. The evening also includes performances of patriotic music by school bands and choral groups, as well as a candlelight vigil. www.scottsdaleaz.gov.

ProMusica performs with other Valley groups this weekend

ProMusica Arizona Chorale and Orchestra of Anthem will perform Mozart’s “Requiem” (a work being performed by groups throughout the country on 9/11) at two Valley churches on Sun, Sept 11. www.promusicaaz.org.

Mozart’s “Requiem” is also being performed at a “Remembrance and Renewal” concert at UA’s Centennial Hall in Tucson on Sun, Sept 11 at 3pm. It features the Tucson Symphony Orchestra and Tucson Chamber Artists’ professional choir. www.uapresents.org.

The Damocles Trio, who met as doctoral students at The Juilliard School in NYC, will perform the “Requiem Trio” by Spanish composer Salvador Brotons (b.1959) at Tempe Center for the Arts at 2:30pm on Sun, Sept 11.

The work was “written especially for the group to commemorate the tragic terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001.” The piece was first performed in Sept 11, 2004 in NYC.

Tempe officials note that “this concert will be linked to the Tempe Beach Park 9/11 Healing Field and other city commemoration events.” The concert also features the music of Dvorak and Villa Lobos. www.damoclestrio.com and www.friendsofTCA.org.

The Tucson Pops Orchestra, with guest conductor George Hanson, performs “Americana: Remember 9/11″ Sun, Sept 11 at Reid Park in Tucson at 6:30pm. www.sept11tucson.org.

The National Unity Flag will hang in Scottsdale this weekend

Folks looking for additional 9/11 memorials and related events can check with local interfaith or religious groups, performing arts venues, universities or colleges, museums, local governments and community centers for local offerings.

If your Arizona organization is presenting a music, dance, theater or visual arts event in remembrance of 9/11, please comment below to let our readers know.

– Lynn

Note: Several 9/11 remembrance events will be televised, including a New York Philharmonic concert with Alan Gilbert conducting Mahler’s “Resurrection” (Sept 11 on PBS). Listen to KJZZ 91.5 all week for 9/11 memorial coverage (including 9 hours of live coverage on 9/11). www.kjzz.org. Watch the “9/11: 10 Years Later” concert live Thurs, Sept 8 and share your reflections with others at facebook.com/KennedyCenter by clicking on the 9/11 Livestream tab.

Coming up: Remembering 9/11 with literature and love

Choosing a performing arts college

The happy day came just a few weeks ago. Lizabeth, our 17-year-old high school senior, finally got that last college admissions letter. We can all stop clinging to the mailbox, and turn instead to thoughts of mounting college costs and creative contents for care packages.

Lizabeth is in the final stages of deciding where to attend college — a step that follows a host of others. Researching schools. Deciding where to apply. Completing applications. Securing letters of recommendation. Traveling to campus tours and theater program auditions.

And now, revisiting information and observations about her three top choices to determine which college or conservatory feels most like home.

Xanthia Walker holds an M.F.A. in Theatre for Youth from Arizona State University in Tempe

For fellow families with children facing similar decisions, I’ve garnered tips from Xanthia Walker, M.F.A. — education associate with Phoenix Theatre, faculty member at Arizona School for the Arts and co-founder of Rising Youth Theatre.

Walker has worked as a resident artist for the Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development, Free Arts of Arizona and the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections.

She currently teaches “Theatre for Social Change” at ASA in Phoenix — where students are developing an original theater production titled “Like Everyone Else” with the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center.

“Choosing a school is a very personally specific decision,” says Walker. “I think a lot of it is about knowing what you want.” Big school or small school? Dedicated college town or urban campus?

My husband James did a lot of work with Lizabeth during the pre-application period to help her identify wants and needs — and to search out schools that seemed to match her interests and priorities.

They put together a notebook with school profiles and such that Lizabeth used all through the appplication process. It was especially helpful during meetings with the ASA college counselor, and now serves as a place to put more detailed information on schools in her top tier (faculty bios, alumni achievements, history of works performed by students, etc.).

Walker encourages students to “sit down and think about what you want out of your college experience.” Make a list with three sections — your wants, your needs and your no-ways. 

Maybe you want to live in a big city, need affordable housing but think having a roommate is out of the question. It’s best to consider these factors early in the process — even visiting possible schools before applying when feasible.

“As a student,” shares Walker, “I learned so much about the schools I was considering that I would have had no way of understanding had I not been able to physically be in the spaces.” She’s a strong proponent of site visits for both undergraduate and graduate programs.

“Meeting the students and professors, getting the vibe of the school community, actually having face to face conversations with people and taking a tour of the department/campus — and even sitting in on some classes directly influenced my choices, and even changed my mind,” she adds.

“What I thought I would love pre-visit,” reflects Walker, “was different than what I actually loved post-visit.”

Though there’s plenty of buzz about “the best” schools in the country for those studying performing arts, Walker says it’s better to think in terms of “best departments” instead of “best schools.” Not every school excels in every area. “Look at the specific departments where you will be spending your time,” suggest Walker, “and compare that way.”

There’s also the “college” versus “conservatory” question. Again, Walker says there’s no better option — just the need to match what’s offered with what a student is looking for.

I’ll share more of Walker’s thoughts on the college/conservatory questions, and her tips for evaluating specific theater departments and programs, in tomorrow’s post.

In the meantime, please comment below if you’re a college or theater professional with tips to share — or a parent or student who has found certain approaches/strategies helpful in the great “choosing a performing arts college” debate.

– Lynn

Note: Click here for information on the ASU M.F.A. Theatre for Youth program and here to read an ASU profile of Walker.

Coming up: Choosing between college theater programs

Old dog, new tricks

My husband presented me with a little something in red and white the other night. Not a Valentine’s Day gift, as you might expect. But a plastic card bearing the letters “AARP.”

Apparently I’m now old enough to get the senior discount at my local Denny’s, plus other benefits I’ll read up on some other time when I run out of crossword puzzles or Earl Grey.

As the phrase “old dog, new tricks” popped into my head, I recalled my most recent adventures with Childsplay — a Tempe-based theater company founded in 1977.

I attended last Saturday’s early matinee performance of “Go, Dog. Go!” at Tempe Center for the Arts – and was delighted by the endless parade of new tricks.

Count me among the many folks who never cease to wonder how on earth Childsplay manages to outdo themselves at every turn. It’s mind-boggling, and not because I’m 50.

My daughter, Jennifer, turns 20 this year. “Go, Dog. Go!” by P.D. Eastman was one of her favorite books during childhood. She’s hesitant to see a live performance based on the book for fear it will ruin her memories of the story somehow.

But I have strong evidence to the contrary — my own memories of absolutely elated preschoolers and ebullient parents who also attended last Saturday’s 1pm show.

Think one-ring circus colliding with comedic theater, and you have Childsplay’s spin on “Go, Dog. Go!” — a Steven Dietz and Allison Gregory adaptation of the book that features music by Michael Koerner.

Childsplay’s “Go, Dog. Go!” is a “theater in the round” experience brimming with actor (dog)/audience interaction — plus plenty of hats and pratfalls.

Think roller skates and all sorts of wheeled modes of transport. Think vollying a giant inflated ball back and forth a la rock concert. Think giant props, and plenty of them.

“Go, Dog. Go!” is a full-blown “bells and whistles” production.

During intermission, families had lots of great options — including going outside to run off some steam and hitting the Childsplay gift boutique for books, CDs, stuffed animals or signed cast photos (there’s even an adorable silver sparkly photo album just for holding Childsplay memories).

Too few headed to the exhibit of glass works currently featured in the TCA Gallery. It’s full of whimsical kid-friendly fare, including several multi-media works with neon lighting.

Several enjoyed educational materials with fun dog-related themes found throughout the lobby — including matching games featuring dog breeds and characteristics, and words from the show presented in diverse languages.

Childsplay offers all sorts of educational programs — from field trips and school tours to Childsplay Academy classes for children and teens. Online registration for popular summer programs starts today, Feb 12, at 10am.

Learning and laughing — it never gets old.

– Lynn

Note: The 9th annual “dog friendly” “Liver Life Walk” takes place Sat, March 19. Click (or paw) here for details.

Coming up: Fun with cats

Photos courtesy of Childsplay

Road trip: Balboa Theatre

Balboa Theatre in San Diego

I confess to feeling like a bit of a traitor. Eager to see the musical “Next to Normal,” I went with Lizabeth to San Diego for the weekend so we could see the show at the Balboa Theatre.

We’re longtime season ticket holders for the “Broadway Across Arizona” series at ASU Gammage, but haven’t any way of knowing whether “Next to Normal” will be part of their 2011-2012 slate.

When a small group of students from Lizabeth’s school went to NYC last year, everyone else saw “The Phantom of the Opera” on Broadway. Lizabeth chose to see “Next to Normal” instead, and took another student along for the show — only to learn that an understudy was replacing Alice Ripley (winner of a 2009 Tony Award for best performance by a leading actress in a musical) for that performance.

Young fans sometimes linger after the show to request autographs

We waited a long time outside the Balboa Theatre stage door after Saturday night’s “Next to Normal” performance — hoping to meet Ripley and tell her just how powerful we found her performance.

Though she didn’t come out after the show (we suspect she was feeling a bit under the weather), we did get to chat with several other cast members — all very gracious about talking with folks, signing programs and posing for pictures.

Considering all the lights and strobe effects in the show, I half expected cast members to wince at the thought of enduring a flurry of flashes. But they seemed happy to linger, with smiles and personalities as bright as those amazing lights on the three-tier set.

Balboa Theatre features beautiful decor

We shared that we’d come from Arizona — and folks asked “Which part of Arizona?” My answer — “the liberal part” — drew a hearty laugh from a cast member who shared that he’d grown up in Utah. We felt among friends.

Also waiting at the stage door that night were two Arizona students — including an ASU journalism major. I gave her my card and invited her to send me a review of “Next to Normal” — which she sent nearly perfectly polished and before “deadline.”

This chocolate joint was open past midnight!

We were among the final folks to abandon the quest to meet Ms. Ripley. When the theater security guards lock up and a police car starts lingering nearby, you get the feeling your level of interest might be misconstrued.

But before we moved on for a late night Ghirardelli run, we chatted with a delightful stage mom. I’m afraid to attempt the spelling of her name — which is quite beautiful and exotic. But I can handle the name of her 8-year-old son, Pierre.

Perhaps Pierre will sign autographs some day

Apparently Pierre was terribly shy until his parents enrolled him in a theater class, which introduced him to a world where different can be good. Now he’s becoming a regular on the San Diego Junior Theatre stage.

Remembering as we spoke that Theater Works’ Youth Works in Peoria is readying to open “James and the Giant Peach,” I invited Pierre’s mom to have him give me a call. Seems he’s an avid reader of Roald Dahl — the author of the book on which this play is based. I also encouraged her to make an Arizona road trip to explore our family-friendly theater offerings by Childsplay and others.

The beaches of San Diego (portrayed in this mural at the airport) are hard to leave behind

We’ve never spent a night at the theater without being introduced to compelling ideas and creative people — whether here in the Valley, on Broadway, or in another state. I can’t wait to see what Arizona companies and venues are offering during the 2011-2012 season.

Even the folks who sell show merchandise are friendly and fun

Something tells me that a pair of young men we met in San Diego will be heading to Tempe this week to see “Spring Awakening” at ASU Gammage. It sounds like they may follow this musical the way young adults of earlier generations sought out the Grateful Dead or Bruce Springsteen.

But what of “Next to Normal?” I’ll share thoughts on the show in a future post — and am delighted today to share a review by Gabrielle Abrams, whose writing I expect to be reading in all sorts of places for many years to come.

– Lynn

Note: Visit the “On Stage” section of the daily online calendar at www.raisingarizonakids.com to learn about family-friendly theater options here in the Valley.

Coming up: Film competition for high school students, Valley theater company holds playwriting competition, More history meets theater

Photos by Lynn Trimble (with special thanks to Lizabeth for enduring her mother’s fascination with photographing signs and other oddities)

The musical “Hair” comes full circle

Your first pet. Your first kiss. Your first car. Most of us can recall a variety of “firsts” from our own lives.

But Caren Lyn Tackett of Boston, who performs the role of the Sheila in the current touring production of the Broadway musical Hair, recalls something more.

Tackett grew up listening to the original cast recording of "HAIR"

Stories of her parents’ first date – that night in the ‘70s when her mom took her dad to see the musical Hair during one of its earlier incarnations.

Eventually they married, and counted a signed cast album of Hair among their most prized possessions. Tackett grew up listening to the record over and over again. “I was obsessed with it,” she recalls.

Tackett first performed in Hair with the NYC Central Park production during 2008, and says she was especially thrilled with the show’s vibe within an outdoor setting.

Hackett first performed in HAIR at Central Park in NYC in 2008 (Photo: Joan Marcus)

You get the feeling in talking with Tackett that things like peace and love are more than quaint retro reminiscences. They’re values she’s thrilled to convey with every performance of Hair.

“I have a real personal identification with Sheila,” shares Tackett. “She’s a student, a real part of the tribe and very politically minded.”

Tackett describes Sheila as ambitious, sharing the beliefs of fellow tribe members but refusing to stop there. “She acts on everything she believes.”

Cast of the 2010 national tour of HAIR (Photo: Joan Marcus)

Sheila goes to Washington, D.C. to “try and levitate the Pentagon” and does all she can to engage others in the tribe who are content to champion ideas without acting upon them.

“I can still hear my mother’s voice,” muses Sheila. “Don’t let being a woman hold you back.”

We sometimes forget how little time has passed since gender and race were used with alarming regularity to devalue fellow citizens.

Hair serves as a powerful testament to the challenges of generations present and past – and inspires those who experience it to dream, and to do.

We spoke as Tackett was in Washington, D.C. with the Hair tourand with her family, which includes three-year-old daughter Ravyn Sioux (a name meant to honor Native American roots on both sides of the family).

Lawrence Stallings, Steel Burkhardt and Matt DeAngelis of the 2010 national tour of HAIR (Photo: Joan Marcus)

Apparently the tiny Tackett is already rocking the activism vibe during gleeful trips to see the Lincoln Memorial and other national treasures. “She loves to recite the stories and facts,” muses Tackett.

Seems Tackett was exposed to music early and often, describing her father’s family as “a bunch of jazz and blues musicians in the New England area.”

“My dad’s side is multi-racial,” says Tackett–recalling his role in establishing a “black and white orchestra” during the 1910s. “It was a big deal back then,” reflects Tackett.

Cast of the 2010 national tour of HAIR (Photo: Joan Marcus)

But Hair isn’t her only full circle experience. Seems Tuckett and Matt DeAngelis (Woof), both performing in the current national tour of Hair, have shared the stage before — during a student production of Godspell at Boston’s Masconomet Regional High School. They even attended the same elementary school.

“I always knew I would do theater,” says Tackett. Seems her high school acting peers were a close, supportive bunch. “It was such a beautiful experience.” She went on to major in musical theatre at Emerson College — but left to take an acting gig. 

Tackett is glad she realized early on that acting was a viable career choice, and that her parents were supportive of her decision. “Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t have a career in musical theater and that it can’t last,” insists Tackett.

“It’s never impossible.”

– Lynn

Note: HAIR is being performed at ASU Gammage in Tempe Dec 7-12. Visit the ASU Gammage website for show and ticket information, plus the scoop on special events and promotions for this and future shows. While the show does include brief nudity, Tackett notes that it’s done in a very tasteful way, and hopes this won’t discourage anyone from attending.

Coming up: “Evening of Arts” at the Children’s Museum of Phoenix, Valley visual arts news, Art festivals featuring family fun