Tag Archives: street art

Hangin’ with Haring

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Now that our youngest daughter attends college in Lower Manhattan, I’ve taken to exploring various parts of NYC the way I hope Phoenix visitors will also hit Scottsdale, Tempe and such. My latest forays have taken me to Brooklyn, which is home to charming architecture, top-notch art venues and lots of young families.

Walking is the best way to explore NYC, but sometimes the sheer volume of things on my “must see” list makes cabbing it the more logical choice. I’ve thrown more than a few taxi drivers for a loop by rolling down the window to snap photos of street art while whizzing past it or sitting idle at a street light.

That’s when I call artist Keith Haring to mind. He gleaned more than a few glares during early days creating street art in NYC, and snapping photos of similarly-inspired artists might be the closest I ever get to achieving his level of creativity. Haring lived from 1958 to 1990, and his work is featured in the “Keith Haring: 1978-1982″ exhibition running through July 8 at the Brooklyn Museum.

It’s startling, when you consider the size and scope of this exhibition, to realize that it represents just a four year period in Haring’s life. The man was prolific, passionate and provocative — often depicting body parts in unconventional ways during a time when America was coming to grips with the AIDS epidemic and shifts in cultural norms around sexuality.

Folks unfamiliar with the name Keith Haring have likely seen some of his tradmark images. Black outlines of people with red hearts. Dogs and babies. Nowadays you can find Haring creations on all sorts of things — like the round kitchen brush I brought home from the Brooklyn Museum store, hoping it’ll inspire more time with dirty dishes. Art should make even the most mundane parts of life more interesting and fun.

– Lynn

Note: Click here to explore Brooklyn Museum offerings, here to learn more about the Phoenix Art Museum and here for information on the Tucson Museum of Art.

Coming up: New finds at the Tempe Center for the Arts gallery, Play time with James Garcia

A mural grows in Brooklyn

I discovered this 2009 work of public art at 960 Prospect Place in Brooklyn while walking recently from the Jewish Children’s Museum to the Brooklyn Children’s Museum.

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It’s one of many youth murals created through the Groundswell Community Mural Project. Click here to learn more about the organization and to enjoy more of their work, here to read the names of young artists who worked on this mural with lead artist Joe Matunis and assistant artist Crystal Clarity and here for information about New Yorkers Against Gun Violence.

– Lynn

Note: Photos by Lynn Trimble

Coming up: What’s the buzz?

Walk on the art side

The Beastro participates in 4th Fridays in Prescott

Families who’ve resolved to get more fit during the New Year have several art walk options that make power walking a bit more playful. Check out these art walks, which couple time to stroll with opportunities to experience local arts and culture.

Downtown Chandler Art Walk. Takes place the third Friday of every month along San Marcos Place and Boston Street. The event features art in various mediums, live music from local talent and a fun family atmosphere. Learn more at www.downtownchandlerartwalk.com.

Artist Alicia Van Noy Call painting during a Prescott 4th Friday event

Downtown Mesa 2nd Friday. Takes place the second Friday of each month from 6-10pm on and around West Downtown Main Street. The event features open galleries, live music and hands-on activities. Learn more at www.2ndfridaynightout.com.

First Friday Artwalk. Takes place from 6-9pm the first Friday of each month in historic downtown Flagstaff. The event features special art exhibitions, performances, live music and treats from local art galleries and businesses. Learn more at www.flagstaffartwalk.com.

First Friday Phoenix Art Walk. Takes place the first Friday of each month from 6-10pm. The event features more than 70 galleries, venues and art-realted spaces — with free event shuttles based at the Phoenix Art Museum. Learn more www.artlinkinc.wordpress.com.

Rowena Tank enjoying a 4th Friday event in Prescott

Gallery Row in Tucson Artwalk. Takes place every Thursday from 5-7pm. The event features open galleries, live music and wine tastings. Learn more at www.tucsongalleryrow.com.

Prescott’s 4th Friday Art Walks. Takes place the fourth Friday of each month, with art galleries listing various art walk hours (most start at 5pm and end at 8pm). The event features open art galleries, live music, food and more. Galleries invite visitors to bring non-perishable food items for donation to the Prescott Community Cupboard. Learn more at www.artthe4th.com.

Scottsdale ArtWalk. Takes place every Thursday from 7-9pm in the Scottsdale Art District (in and around Old Town). The event features open galleries, live music and more. Special ArtWalks each month have diverse themes (Jan. 2012: A Taste of…; Feb. 2012: Best of …, March 2012: Native Arts…, April 2012: Glass Act…). Learn more at www.scottsdalegalleries.com.

– Lynn

Note: Events details are always subject to change, so please verify before attending. For a comprehensive listing of events for families, check the Raising Arizona Kids Magazine calendar in print or online.

Coming up: Cinderella– with a twist, Wings & things

Photos courtesy of the City of Prescott Office of Tourism

Art meets protest

Signs, flags and artwork are popping up all over Zuccotti Park in New York City

Protester concerns include jobs, economic justice, ongoing wars and more

Some want true democracy back, while others think democracy is the problem

You don’t need to be a protester to embrace some of their messages

Some protesters are painting to express themselves and help get the word out

This is one of the few pieces of art that stays in one place over time

Some may wonder whether protesters feel they exist in order to resist

A common theme among protesters is the need to treat people as individuals

Art is being created on balloons, canvas, cardboard and everyday objects

Many protester signs and bits of artwork reflect themes of human kindness

– Lynn

Note: Click here to read an article in The New York Times about art-related OWS protests.

Coming up: This is what democracy looks like, More from NYC — museums, libraries and Broadway shows

Update: Apparently the art of Occupy Wall Street has come a long way — check out this article by Michele Elam for CNN. Click here to enjoy a post called “The Art of Occupation” from one of the blogs I read each day.

NYC: Fun finds

Pop up piano from Sing for Hope sitting in an NYC park

I came to NYC with a list of places I hoped to experience, but because we’re doing most of the city by foot and subway, I’m stumbling on all sorts of unexpected treasures.

While eating Italian fare on a Greenwich Village sidestreet one day, we saw a local television report a man dubbed the “Crazy Piano Guy,” whose been performing random acts of music on NYC streets since 2003. He’s careful to note in his bio that he’s not actually “crazy” but apparently he’s elevated the slur to a savvy exercise in branding.

That got me searching for New York street music, and soon I discovered an organization called “Sing for Hope,” which has pianos and players fanned out across the city through July 2 — when they’ll present a free concert in an atrium at Lincoln Center. Lizabeth played one we found in a Lincoln Center plaza while we were there to see “War Horse” Thursday night, so I suppose now I can brag about her “playing Lincoln Center.”

I found this farmers market fare while searching for the WTC Tribute Center

I took the subway to and from the Eugene O’Neill Theater Wednesday night for “The Book of Mormon” and ended up a bit off the beaten path while trying to make my way back to the hotel. The subway I can master, but the streets I have yet to memorize. There are more than a few of them here.

I found this Hudson River ferry stop after exploring Poets House

But getting lost has its own rewards — like discovering a pair of pianos in a park where two lovers sat on a nearby bench. The pianos were retired for the evening, and covered in tarps. A middle-aged man walking through the park with his wife gleefully approach one of the instruments, but his wife insisted they move along instead of pausing to play. My heart sank.

I got a little gleeful myself with this next find — the Poets House near the Battery Park City Library I happened upon during a futile attempt to visit the World Trade Center Tribute Center. I visited the library too, which was alive with color and children and conversation. Soon I was strolling a riverwalk realizing that the vibrancy and life in NYC is the greatest tribute to those who lost their lives here on 9/11.

Liberty Community Garden

I never reached the tribute center near Church and Liberty streets because I wasn’t clever enough to navigate all the construction detours, but I did luck upon the “Liberty Community Garden,” another oasis in this city of 8 million. It’s bordered on one side by a giant financial center and a simple outdoor basketball court on the other. I also explored the World Financial Center “Green Market.”

I encounted a bit of street art called “Tiles for America” while walking around Greenwich Village with Lizabeth Tuesday afternoon. It’s a chain link fence strewn with tattered tiles painted in remembrance of 9/11. There’s nothing fun about recalling that dreadful day, but I was delighted to find this art — one of many collections inspired by loss, heroism, love and hope.

Detail of the Tiles for America street exhibit in NYC

I’m eager to experience another fun find, just now in the making, next time I’m in NYC. It’s an art exhibition featuring photos of children from around the globe, and it’s coming to “Park51 Community Center” — a site known to some as “the mosque at Ground Zero.” If you like the project, you can support it via “Kickstarter.” I found this gem by playing with my smart phone as Lizabeth was in a college meeting.

I may have to settle for virtual NYC experiences during our final day in the city. My feet feel pushed to the limit and I’m too thrifty to pop for cab fare. When Jennifer and I visited San Francisco together several years ago, we walked far too many miles through city streets and Golden Gate Park. She ended up needing foot and ankle surgery, and I’d like to avoid a similar fate.

It is possible, I suppose, to have too much fun.

– Lynn

Note: Many of my most cherished photos appear to be lost because of memory card problems, but if my hubby/tech man gets the kinks out I’ll be updating this post with more pictures over the weekend.

Coming up: Musings on “The Book of Mormon”

Art adventures: Historic Glendale

When I found myself with unexpected free time last weekend, I headed to Glendale to explore their historic district in search of all things arts and culture.

First I headed to a street lined with antique shops, cafes and other charming offerings — and then hit the Glendale Civic Plaza, where I admired the city’s public safety memorial.

After driving just a few blocks, I discovered Catlin Court, but failed to notice until after I’d parked that the lot I’d chosen was adjacent to the Manor at Catlin Court – where a young couple was exchanging wedding vows during an outdoor ceremony.

I tip-toed away from my car, camera in hand, and strolled the neighborhood in search of a bit of local flavor — and am pleased to share some photos from my adventures below:

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If you’re eager to enjoy some casual outdoor time this weekend, consider attending the free “Artwerks First Saturdays” event April 2 from 10am-4pm.

To learn more about arts and culture in the city of Glendale, check out their online “Glendale Public Arts” brochure  — available at the www.visitglendale.com website.

– Lynn

Note: Say a special hello to the fine folks at “A Shot of Java” and “The Open Door” — who were especially gracious during my visit to their neck of the woods. I’m sorry to report that you can no longer enjoy The Bead Museum because it’s been permanently closed.

Coming up: Phoenix Improv Festival, Fringe gets twisted

Art adventures: Roosevelt Row

Recently I headed downtown with my son Christopher eager to shoot some photos. We decided to stroll a bit along “Roosevelt Row” after the bold graffiti art caught our eye.

We grabbed drinks at a cute little place called “Carly’s” (home to the “Twilight” homage painting in the slide show below), then walked over to the “Eye Lounge” art gallery (next to “Modified Arts,” which was closed at the time).

In a little gift shop next to “Eye Lounge” exhibit space, we found all sorts of eclectic gifts, some more odd than others. Funky ties. T-shirts featuring the fanged rabbit art of Sebastien Millon. Jewelry by local artists.

Here’s a slide show featuring just a few of our many fun finds…

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While we don’t know the names of artists who created the graffiti we encountered, I do want to share the names of two artists whose work on exhibit at “Eye Lounge” is included in the above slide show.

The gold skull is part of a Crystal Phelps exhibition titled “Fielding Form” and the sculpture is a work titled “The Obsessive Man” by Benjamin Phillips — a cautionary tale, perhaps, for editors who have little too much fun wielding the red pen.

Click here to learn more about “Roosevelt Row” — a fun place to support local merchants, discover unique events and just kick around with a camera.

You can head to “Roosevelt Row” and surrounding areas this weekend, March 19 & 20, for an event dubbed “Art Detour 23.” It runs Sat 10am-6pm and Sun noon-6pm in the “Arts District of Downtown Phoenix.”

Guided tours of “Roosevelt Row” — departing from the information booth at 515 Arts — take place Sat at 10:45am and 12:45pm.

Click here to learn about other “Art Detour 23″ offerings — which include demonstrations, artist talks, meet & greets, live music performances and fashion events.

Just promise me you won’t buy the last fanged bunny top. It’s just the sort of thing my teens would enjoy finding in their Easter baskets.

– Lynn

Note: Roosevelt Row also participates in First Friday and other downtown Phoenix events.

Coming up: Art programs for kids

Photo credit: Lynn Trimble