Tag Archives: Steve Yockey

Who let the “Wolves” out?

Mexican Gray Wolf - Photo from the Brookfield Zoo

Stray Cat Theatre in Tempe let the “Wolves” out Saturday night as four Valley actors presented a staged reading of a new Steve Yockey play titled “Wolves.” Yockey’s “Octopus” was part of Stray Cat’s last season and his work appears a perfect fit for Stray Cat audiences.

Seems Yockey has a thing for fairy tales and lava lamps, and for blending comedy with horror. He describes “Wolves” as a “predatory fairy tale for adults” — even referencing Little Red Riding Hood with a red sweat jacket we’re left to imagine hanging on the back of a chair in an apartment shared by two men with very different sorts of delusions.

Imagined because few props are present during a staged reading. In this case the set consisted of several chairs and rooms outlined in tape, and props included a red guitar and an axe. “Wolves” is a bloody affair, but audience members have to use their imagination to get there until the work is farther along in the production process.

Yockey praised founding Stray Cat artistic director Ron May, who’ll soon be presenting his 10th season, for his work with “Wolves” — and noted that the four actors involved made significant contributions to refining the work. After two days of work starting with the customary “table read” (actors reading through the script together), Yockey made several revisions to “Wolves.”

It sounds like he’ll be making plenty more, given his receptivity to several observations and insights offered by audience members. Yokey was enthusiastic about their comments, joking that they beat some of the usual questions (like “How did you memorize all those lines?”) asked by less savvy crowds.

We’re fortunate in the Valley to have a wealth of fresh and experienced talent like performers featured in the Stray Cat reading of “Wolves” — including Drew Leatham and Jonathan Furedy, both seen in Stray Cat performances last season. Also Adam Pinti, who’s sporting a nifty new MFA from ASU. “We snatched him up quick-like,” quips May.

Mexican Gray Wolf - Photo from Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Of course, I’m partial to Yolanda London. Her credits last season include “THIS” with Actors Theatre, “Avenue Q” at Phoenix Theatre and “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill” with Black Theatre Troupe — but we’ve been enjoying her work at Childsplay in Tempe for years.

I’m also partial to wolves of the real variety because my son Christopher is big on wildlife education and conservation, having surpassed 1,000 hours of volunteer work with the Phoenix Zoo several years ago (after that I stopped counting).

After you’ve checked out Yockey’s online portfolio and future offerings by Stray Cat Theatre, take some time to explore the wild life and times of wolves in Arizona and throughout the Southwest. Believing their fate isn’t tied to our own is its own form of misguided thinking.

• Eight, Arizona PBS airs “Wolves in Paradise” Wed, Aug 3, at 10pm.

• The Phoenix Zoo participates in wolf conservation and offers related information online.

• The Arizona Fish and Game Department provides information on wolf-related policies and programs.

• The “Howling for Justice” blog offers musings on wolf-related advocacy.

My apologies to octopus lovers for the missed opportunity to cover octopus-related issues during Stray Cat’s last season. But hey, at least I did justice to all those sparrows.

– Lynn

Note: Steve Yockey’s “Wolves,” featuring direction by Ron May, was Stray Cat Theatre’s first staged reading of a new work. Stage directions were provided by Kelly Coughlin-Celaya, and “special thanks” to Childsplay and Alfredo Macias were noted.

Coming up: AriZoni nomination night, More playwriting pearls from Steve Yockey, To baby or not to baby…

Cats v. dogs, theater style

There are cat people, and there are dog people. 

The differences might make for an amusing Broadway show, but for now we have to settle for productions that feature one species or the other (the pets, not their people). 

Scene from "Seussical"-Photo by Sara Krulwich appeared in "The New York Times"

There’s “Cats” from composer Andrew Lloyd Webber—based on poet T.S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats.” I never got this one, despite being a cat-lover. 

There’s “Seussical” from Flaherty and Ahrens, a 2000 Broadway musical based on the works of children’s author Dr. Seuss. Who doesn’t love the song “Oh, The Thinks You Can Think?” 

And there’s “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” a Tennessee Williams play that has nothing to do with cats, but still strikes my fancy. 

For dog lovers, you’ve got “Annie”–featuring the lovable mutt “Sandy”–which will soon enjoy another Broadway revival.

There’s “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” with everyone’s favorite: “Snoopy.” You gotta love a canine who sits atop his doghouse banging away at a Smith Corona

If you’re not old enough to know what that is, you aren’t old enough to see the shows I’ll be previewing after another couple of paragraphs.

I should confess at this point to being more of a cat person, though I try to be open minded. I grew up enjoying the companionship of both.

Scene from the musical "Annie"

My first pet was actually a little chihuahua named “Nikitita” (no relation to ABBA’s “Chiquitita”) who broke my heart by running away one night during a fierce Colorado thunderstorm. 

I was raised by a single mother who always felt safer with dogs in the house (though our Doberman was milder than milk toast). 

Still, I’ve never gotten the hang of enjoying another creature licking my face. Cats lick themselves. That I can live with. 

If there’s a local theater company dedicated to dogs, I have yet to discover it. (Those of you who find your minds racing with tacky humor at this point need a good lick in the face.) 

Scene from the musical "Cats"

But I so love the alternative theater folks whose name seems a bit of an homage to those fabulous felines. 

It’s Stray Cat Theatre in Tempe, performing at the space once occupied by Childsplay, another Tempe titan of irresistible theater. 

While Childsplay delivers mostly “G-rated” fare, Stray Cat has more of an “R-rated” feel. 

You won’t find anything outrageously controversial in Childsplay’s 2010-2011 season, which includes “Go, Dog. Go!” based on the books by P.D. Eastman. 

Scene from "Reasons to be Pretty"-Photo from "The New York Times"

But Stray Cat Theatre, home of artistic director Ron May, is another story… 

Stray Cat’s ninth season opens with Neil Labute’s “Reasons to be Pretty” directed by April Miller. The show (Sept. 24-Oct. 9) is “a love story about the near impossibility of love.” I can’t wait to see Greg and his girlfriend Steph go at it after he casually mentions a few of her physical imperfections. 

Next up is Enrique Urueta’s “Learn to be Latina” directed by Ron May. At this point, I’d settle for merely learning to speak Spanish. The show (Dec. 3-18) is a comedic look at serious issues of cultural identity and making it in the music business. I’m eager to witness pop singer Hanan’s attempt to transform herself from Lebanese to Latina! 

Stray Cat’s first production of 2011 will be Steve Yockey’s “Octopus,” also directed by Ron May. How terribly thoughtful of them to choose something in keeping with my animal theme. Isn’t it just like a cat to do it’s own thing while leading the humans to believe it was all their idea? This baby (March 25-April 9) deals with the fallout of group sex, so leave the kittens at home if you go there. 

"Abraham Lincoln's Big Gay Dance Party" at SF Playhouse-Photo by Zabrina Tipton

Finally, there’s Aaron Loeb’s “Abraham Lincoln’s Big Gay Dance Party” directed by Ron May—who clearly takes pride in being a provocateur par excellence. This piece (no pun intended) closes out Stray Cat’s 2010-2011 season with a bang (May 20-June 11). It features the “trial of the century” in which Lincoln’s teacher faces charges of asking whether Lincoln might have been gay. I’m not sure how you get from courtroom drama to dance party, but have no doubts that May will pull it off and more. 

For those of you who prefer tamer fare, I’ll offer a future post on the 2010-2011 Childsplay season. I have to wonder, though, whether their choice of “Go, Dog. Go!” reveals a clear canine bias… 

–Lynn